Sunday, March 6, 2011

Black Women in the Mathematical Sciences


J. McKeen Cattell (1913), owner and editor of Science, "There is not a single mulatto who has done creditable scientific work." Others in the mathematical sciences were quoted as saying, "The Negro is incapable of succeeding."

Ancient and present achievements contradict such statements. We invite you to visit a website that exposes the inaccuracy of those proclamations by exhibiting the accomplishments of the peoples of Africa and the African Diaspora within the Mathematical Sciences.

Less than 1% of all mathematicians are Black. Only 25% of these Black mathematicians are women. [SOURCE]

6 comments:

DN Lee said...

Great source. Dr Charles Turner is also an academic Hero of mine and a Pioneer. I study Animal Behavior and he is recognized as one of the 1st Animal Behavior Scientists and the first Black Animal Behavior Scientists. Because of racial policies at the turn of the century he was unable to secure tenure at a university and taught high school in St. Louis. He maintained his scientific productivity and conducted pioneering research in bee communication -- the waggle dance. The Animal Behavior Society www.animalbehavior.org recognizes him as a pioneering professional in the field and hosts an undergraduate diversity program in his honor each year at conference.

Plus, I am a member of AAAS (the publisher of Science Magazine). The Society is definitely more diverse-minded, now. Consider the time - Eugenics was the rage...and some people may still try to reference it, the idea was and still is a lie. Any scientist (particularly, population geneticists) worth his/her salt will not co-sign such an idiotic and racist comment.

Keep celebrating Black Achievement, especially in Math. Our Kids are smart and come from great stock! Thanks for sharing these links

Villager said...

DN Lee - Our foundation works to fund programs to support young people that want to get engaged in the information technology industry. To do so, we encourage early exposure to science and mathematics in the school. Does Science Magazine delve into the information technology industry very much?

DN Lee said...

it does. It's a comprehensive Science Society - so all areas of STEM, including social sciences are addresed. I am biased, though - as a life scientist. But they conver computer sciences, math, engineering, biotech and any policy issue that would deal with technology, communication, etc. Math, engineering and computer sciences might be the categories to check out.

You can browse the latest issues of Science online for free
http://www.sciencemag.org/magazine.dtl

Villager said...

DN Lee - I passed along the URL for the magazine to national BDPA president and national communications director. Hopefully, a strategic alliance can be formed between BDPA & AAAS over the coming weeks...

The Urban Scientist said...

I hosted a Science Diversity Meme - Women in Science March 2008. I've summarized the Meme and catalogued many of the submitted names. I included this post on the summary, too. Visit the Women in Science Summary at my blog.

Thanks.

Villager said...

Urban Scientist - The depth of response to your meme on female scientists was remarkable. Is there anyway to tell how many of the women in your meme responses were of African descent? If so, I would love to post that subset here on this blog in some manner ... or link to it from your blog if you posted it.

peace, Villager